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How to Become a Catholic.


Please contact the Parish Office for information about how to begin.

Someone who is “not Catholic,” becomes “Catholic” through a formal catechesis, a formal process of sharing of our faith. This catechesis goes by the phrase: Rite of Christian Initiation of Adults (RCIA).

Catechesis has as it center and it goal “... a Person, the Person of Jesus of Nazareth.” (On Catechesis in Our Time no. 5) Catechesis is, therefore, for all ages. It is for all eras of history and for all time to come. It is for adults, for youth, for children; it is, as the Gospel itself, for people of every race and cultural heritage, for people of all strata of society, for those with special needs of every kind.

For adults, however, the RCIA seeks to develop upon one's initial interest in the mystery of Jesus Christ as revealed, as experienced, in the Roman Catholic Church. It is the beginning of a lifelong deepening of a personal relationship with Christ, for and with His People – the Church.

In a series of evening gatherings, once a week from September through Easter, the RCIA ministry preparation is responsible for developing and confirming an understanding in those who are interested in the Catholic religion. To do so, the ministry shares a vision of our history. Reflecting upon the information shared, both in mutual dialogue, faith testimonies, and prayerful readings, the inquirer of the Catholic faith becomes more and more “hungry” to be a member of our faith.

The Church has traditionally named the first movement of faith, evangelization, that initial proclamation of the Good News which stirs a person toward conversion. In recent years, the Church has broadened its understanding of evangelization to be inclusive of the whole of one's lifelong conversion process, such that all of us are on the road of discipleship. This is why in the RCIA process, various rituals are part of the experience, prayed in Sunday Mass with the entire community.

In the Acts of the Apostles we read that the members of the early Christian community “devoted themselves to the teaching of the apostles and to the communal life, to the breaking of the bread and to prayers” (Acts 2:42). Since then, the Church has reiterated the importance of these same dimensions: word, Worship, Community, and Service in its catechetical mission. The RCIA experience, if faithful and effective, will develop an appreciation for these four dimensions of our Catholic life. It will integrate these in the adult for the life of the parish community.